TobCon 2017 Report; All For One Kickstarter

Last weekend was TobCon, successor to WimCon and, ultimately, TimCon. It’s a great little Warhammer con frequented by long-time WFRP fans, including those behind Warpstone and Liber Fanatica. You can read various people’s reactions to the games they ran and played in (including my games) in the thread here.

Anyway, I ran two games, both Zweihänder, and played two. I’ve talked about the games I played in over in the StS thread I just linked to. Here I’d like to offer some thoughts about the games I ran – the intentions I had, how I felt Zweihänder worked, and how I had to adjust on the fly.

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Making Magic Mysterious

Magic is a problem in RPGs. On the one hand, it is supposed to be mysterious and occult (literally: ‘hidden’), but on the other hand the game part of roleplaying games requires consistent rules so as to be fair to the players. The result is that magic is reduced in players’ minds to a kind of science or mathematics.

I’ve spent way too long noodling with magic systems to try to solve this conundrum, but now I think I’ve finally come up with a solution.

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Making the Speak Language Skills Interestingly Useful

A few weeks ago I posted on making the Read/Write skill interestingly useful, but that just raises the question of language skills in general. Tim Eccles’s article on this topic in Warpstone #19 is excellent on the historical and linguistic implications of what we knew about (then-)canon, but this post, like the last one, is going to concentrate more on the in-game practicalities of the skills. Because, like with Read/Write, the exclusivity of the language skills may work in favour of flavour, so to speak, but against the kind of communication a game needs to flow:

This is an example of language problems used wonderfully, but unfortunately few of us are Simon Pegg or Edgar Wright!

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